Lavender Mint Tea

Tea

Lavender Mint Tea
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Servings
1 serving
Passive Time
5 minutes
Servings
1 serving
Passive Time
5 minutes
Lavender Mint Tea
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Votes: 0
Rating: 0
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Servings
1 serving
Passive Time
5 minutes
Servings
1 serving
Passive Time
5 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: serving
Units:
Instructions
  1. In a teapot, combine the lavender flowers and mint. Pour boiling water over the mixture and let steep for 5 minutes.
Recipe Notes

Variations: For more interesting blends, add rosemary, lemon balm or lemon verbena, and rose geranium.

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Kombucha

Kombucha 1

Kombucha
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Servings
4-6 ounces
Passive Time
5-10 days
Servings
4-6 ounces
Passive Time
5-10 days
Kombucha
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Servings
4-6 ounces
Passive Time
5-10 days
Servings
4-6 ounces
Passive Time
5-10 days
Ingredients
Servings: ounces
Units:
Instructions
  1. Put Scoby and finished Kombucha in a gallon jar. Cover with a paper towel or cheese cloth and secure it with a rubber band.
  2. In a 3-quart pot over medium heat, combine tea bags, sugar and 3 cups water. Bring to a boil, and then remove from heat and cover. Let steep for 15 minutes, covered.
  3. Squeeze liquid out of tea bags, and then remove. Add 2 quarts of cool water to the pot.
  4. Add cooled-down tea to the gallon jar. Add more water to fill to shoulder of jar, just before jar starts narrowing in diameter.
  5. Cover with paper towel or cheese cloth and secure with a rubber band. Leave at room temperature for 5-10 days, until it's bubbly and tastes slightly sweet and a little sour.
  6. Pour finished Kombucha into another gallon container, leaving Scoby and 1 1/2 cups of Kombucha behind. Repeat the above steps to make more batches.
  7. Transfer finished Kombucha to bottles or tightly lidded jars. Leave at room temperature for 1-2 days to build up carbonation, and then chill until needed. Finished Kombucha keeps indefinitely, but gets more sour and vinegary over time.
  8. Variation: For a darker, richer Kombucha (which is more traditional), use black tea instead of green tea.
  9. Second Ferments: This would be after your first ferment is finished, you can add any number of combinations of fruit, herbs, and tea blends, etc. to add a different flavor profile to your Kombucha.
  10. I sometimes add Blueberries and a piece of Rosemary to the jar and let it sit for a couple of days. I also use some nice medicinal tea blends. Raisins add carbonation too. It only takes a few per jar. I also put pieces of fresh ginger in too.
  11. Something I usually recommend is to taste the Kombucha when you first are making it, that way you know how sweet it is.
  12. After about 5 days, taste it. You're looking for a slightly sweet, slightly sour taste. If it's still too sweet, let it continue fermenting.
  13. You'll get the best carbonation if you can get it to the above state. If it gets more vinegary, it's still okay, your carbonation won't be as high and the taste will just be slightly different, which is okay. Some people like it this way.
  14. It really is a personal preference.
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It’s Tea Time…what’s your favorite?

Cup of tea

Are you a tea drinker? I do love a good cup of hot tea more so in the winter that in the summer but I’ve found a good herbal blend can be had in my favorite kombucha as well.

Kombucha is something I like to refer to as a magic elixir. It’s actually a fermented tea, for those that aren’t familiar with the term. The best known benefits are it’s loaded with probiotics, enzymes for digestion, high in B vitamins and it’s a great detoxifier. If you’d like to learn more about it, read my article here.

Today, as I’m sipping my cup of chai tea, one of my favorites, I’ve also been conversing with a dear friend about recipes for herbal tea blends, which we both adore. While she’s putting together beautiful blends to give as gifts, I’ve been experimenting with blends for health. I then found this glorious article in Mother Earth News Living that has a plethora of great digestible information. See if you agree.

  1. Chamomile for Anxiety – This is also great for promoting sleep.

To make tea: Gather 1 tsp. dried or tsps. Fresh chamomile flowers and steep in 1 cup boiling water for 15-20 minutes. The longer it steeps, the more bitter it will taste.

  1. Lavender for Sleep Problems – It has profound relaxing, calming and uplifting effects.

To make tea: Steep 3-4 tsp. fresh lavender buds in 1 cup boiling water for about 10 minutes.

  1. Peppermint for Indigestion – Renewing, invigorating and energizing is a perfect pick-me-up. There are also studies showing it to effective at helping symptoms of indigestion and IBS.

To make tea: Steep 1 tsp. dried peppermint leaves in 1 cup boiling water for 10 minutes.

  1. Ginger for Nausea – It helps to boost circulation in the winter and it’s also known to soothe upset stomachs and helps to ease nausea. This includes nausea associated with pregnancy.

To make tea: Steep 3-5 thin slices of ginger root in boiling water for 3 minutes. Strain and enjoy. You can also use grated ginger in tea ball, steeping for about 3 minutes.

  1. Raspberry Leaf for Menstrual Cramps – it’s naturally rich in nutrients including magnesium, potassium, iron and B vitamins. It’s also good for helping with motion sickness and diarrhea. Not to be used during pregnancy.

To make tea: Steep 1 tbsp. dried raspberry leaf in 8 ounces boiling water for at least 5 minutes.

  1. Lemon Balm for Anxiety – Also a natural relaxation aid. It can also help fight headaches and reduce insomnia.

To make tea: Steep 1-2 tsp. dried lemon balm per cup of boiling water. Let steep until it’s cool enough to drink.

  1. Basil for Bad Breath – It’s an excellent source of vitamins A and K, vitamin C and manganese. It’s also rich in antioxidants and has antibacterial properties.

To make tea: Steep 2 tsp. dried basil leaves in 1 cup boiling water for 20 minutes. Strain and sweeten, if you like.

  1. Sage for Sore Throats – Its antimicrobial properties help you fight off colds, as well as treating sore throats. Avoid using sage if you have epilepsy.

To make tea: Combine 3 tsp. dried sage leaves or 10 fresh sage leaves and 1 cup boiling water. Let steep 5 minutes then strain and enjoy.

  1. Rosehips to Boost Immunity – High in vitamin c, about 20 times the vitamin c in oranges.

To make tea: Combine 4 tsp. whole dried rosehips with 4 cups water in a saucepan. Cover, bring to a boil, then simmer for 5 minutes. Strain into a teapot and drink when cooled enough.

  1. Dandelion for Bone Health – It’s loaded with essential minerals such as iron, potassium and beta-carotene, plus vitamins A, C and D.

To make tea: Boil 1 quart water. Turn off heat and add 4 tsp. dandelion leaf. Cover and steep 30-60 minutes, then strain.

These are only a few of the many beautiful herbs and their health benefits. By combining herbs together, you can make amazing herbal tea blends. If you would like to learn more about them, there are many resources available. Amazon is a good source as well as your local library or favorite book store.

Growing your own fresh herbs is a delight. If you can’t or don’t want to grow your own, a favorite and well-trusted source is Mountain Rose Herbs.

What’s been your favorite go-to herb or blend of herbs and why do you use it? Feel free to comment below.

To your health,

Kellie