Soaked Granola

Soaked Granola
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With Gluten-free and Dairy-free options
Servings
10 cups
Servings
10 cups
Soaked Granola
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
With Gluten-free and Dairy-free options
Servings
10 cups
Servings
10 cups
Ingredients
Servings: cups
Units:
Instructions
  1. Place butter and coconut oil in a small sauce pan and heat until melted. Pour into a very large glass bowl and add kefir, buttermilk or coconut milk, water and vinegar; stirring well to combine. Add oats and rye flakes (or buckwheat groats); mix well. Cover the bowl and place it in a warm area of your home for a 12-24 hours. Once oat mixture is done soaking, you're ready for STEP TWO: BAKING. Notes
  2. GF Option: If you're gluten-free you can use ground buckwheat grouts for the soak. You can decrease the amount to 1 cup of ground buckwheat groats and then use 7 cups of GF rolled oats. The reason you need rolled rye or ground buckwheat groats is because they contain the phytase necessary to help break down the high levels of phytic acid in oats. Oats do not contain much phytase so soaking them without a phytase booster (like rolled rye, or ground buckwheat groats for those who are GF) doesn't do much to reduce the phytic acid.
Recipe Notes

STEP TWO: BAKING

3/4 cup raw honey
1/2 cup organic pure maple syrup
1 tsp unrefined sea salt
1 tbsp. ground cinnamon
1 tbsp. pure vanilla extract
Instructions

After soaking time is completed, preheat oven to 200° F.
Add the honey, maple syrup, salt, cinnamon, and vanilla to the bowl of soaked oats. Stir until well combined.
Spread the mixture out over two 12x17-inch rimmed-baking sheets. You may line with parchment paper if you like. Bake for 8 hours, turning the granola after two to three hours. Then turn off oven and allow to remain in the oven until completely cooled.
Remove cooled granola from the oven and mix in any “add-ins” you’d like. The possibilities are endless. I love raisins, cranberries, walnuts, almonds, coconut flakes, other dried fruit options like apricots, bananas, etc. Makes 10-cups of granola (without add-ins).
Serve with as a great breakfast cereal, as a trail mix or over your favorite yogurt or cottage cheese. This recipe has been shared by many, including The Nourishing Home and Cooking God’s Way, which are excellent references.
Notes

It is important to turn granola (mix up) after 2 or 3 hours to avoid the big pieces that will occur if you don’t stir it. Take a spatula and flip pieces of the moist granola over and kind of chop it up into smaller pieces.

I haven’t found it really necessary to do this step again, although some recommend it. Once I’ve stirred it the first time, it seems to be fine. Return the pans back to the oven and let them continue drying for the remainder of the time. Once you’ve reached about 8 hours total, turn off the oven and let the sheets remain there until the oven is completely cool.

If you’re checking the granola before turning off the oven and find that it’s not completely dry, that’s okay. It will continue to dry after you’ve turned off the oven.

Due to some variances in oven temperatures, you may find that your granola isn’t as dry as you’d like it, just pop it back into a 200 degree oven for another 30 or so minutes and repeat the same process. Turn off the oven and let it cool completely.

Once dry, mix in other items you might want in your granola. I put into storage containers. If you don’t eat it fast enough, which is never a problem for me, you can put some in the freezer to help keep it fresh.

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Gluten Free or not to be….that is the question!

go-ahead-its-gluten-free

I have so many conversations with many of you about Gluten. It seems that our current state is “Gluten Free.”

Do you find yourself perusing the grocery store shelves for anything that says it’s Gluten Free or just plain avoiding anything you think might have gluten in it?

If so, you’re not alone. The statistics say that as many as 30% of American adults are actively trying to reduce or eliminate gluten from their diets.

One search even found me face to face with a Gluten Free dating site. The objective, from what I could tell was to help match up gluten-free dieters with others that share the same thoughts or situations.

It’s everywhere, the FDA’s involved, with their labeling standards of course.

Have you ever noticed that when “new” fads arrive, bandwagons get started and people either are head over heal in love with it or they hate it?

Stand around any lunchroom or be at a dinner party, and chances are the conversation will lead to a new diet and today, gluten is the hot topic.

I’m not even saying that continuing on today’s modern diet, you shouldn’t watch the amount you are consuming, but come on…really labeling such foods like potato chips as Gluten free, is that really necessary? They are potatoes the last time I checked…no grains!

In my opinion, if you are in fact looking to reduce gluten in your diet, it’s not necessarily a bad thing if done in the right context. Meaning you aren’t eliminating nutrient dense, naturally gluten-free foods like meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, and nuts rather than the so-called gluten-free junk food.

Do people that lower gluten or eliminate gluten for a time feel better? Absolutely and I believe it’s because our bodies need a break for the barrage that’s being dumped in.

All things in moderation are really what this is all about. We live in a culture and society that likes to overdo and over indulge.

I don’t think that eliminating grains from your diet is the answer. Grains provide valuable nutrients that you can’t otherwise get.

I do feel however, that for a time, while you’re following a good, sound protocol to allow your body to heal, diagnose and treat your specific allergies, the key goal…..are to you ready for this?…IS TO BECOME GLUTEN TOLERANT!

I’m sure this might not be a popular answer….but I feel strongly that we should be wise, smart, buying consumers.

Many are giving up good sourdough breads because they have shunned “gluten”. If you don’t know the benefits of sourdough, read this!

Like I said prior, elimination for a time might be necessary. The intent is to heal and introduce some back in!

Again, when we practice everything in moderation, we’re happier and healthier. The choice is yours!

I will leave you with a little checklist if you will. Something that will at least give you a roadmap to follow and getting the help you need and deserve.

1. Eat organic (avoid foods with added chemicals)

2. Eat only pastured or grass-fed meat and drink raw milk

3. Avoid Genetically Modified Foods – go to www.nongmoshoppingguide.com

4. Avoid corn sugars and beet sugars

5. Avoid vegetable oils (corn, canola, soy and processed foods that contain them)

6. Get Blood testing for Vitamin D and B12 levels and food allergies

8. Avoid antibacterial soaps

9. Make or buy and then eat homemade non-pasteurized lacto-fermented foods and drinks

10. Drink filtered and re-mineralized water (add mineralized salt)

11. Eat sulfur containing foods (cabbage, broccoli, bok choy, garlic, onions, chives, eggs, etc.)

12. Avoid glyphosates (associated with food intolerances, autism, leaky gut, etc.)

13. Use unprocessed salt, avoid commercial salt

14. Expose yourself to the sun, no sunburns and do not use sunglasses

15. Know your farmer and buy locally produced foods

While this list isn’t all inclusive, it certainly is a great start!

Where do you see yourself falling short or what do you need help with? Share below in the comments section or anytime on the Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/LiveLifeYearsYounger

To your health,

Kellie

Holistic Health Coach

PS: Was there something surprising or confusing about the list I shared with you? Want to talk more about it and see how these things mesh into your lifestyle? Click here and let’s talk further!

 

Photo courtesy of www.exposingtruth.com