Open-Faced Barbeque Chicken Melts

Barbeque Chicken Open Faced Sandwich

Open-Faced Barbeque Chicken Melts
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Since I make bone broth a lot, I have chicken meat that I canned. This worked well for this recipe or you could use leftover chicken meat as well. I love a good zingy barbeque sauce and since most of the store-bought versions have less than desirable ingredients, it’s super easy to make your own. This kind of sandwich really is easy to adapt to anything that your family likes or has on hand for that matter. I had a couple mushrooms that needed to be used, therefore they got added, but if you don’t like them, don’t use them. It’s that easy and easy for a quick lunch or supper.
Servings
3 slices
Servings
3 slices
Open-Faced Barbeque Chicken Melts
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  • 4
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Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Since I make bone broth a lot, I have chicken meat that I canned. This worked well for this recipe or you could use leftover chicken meat as well. I love a good zingy barbeque sauce and since most of the store-bought versions have less than desirable ingredients, it’s super easy to make your own. This kind of sandwich really is easy to adapt to anything that your family likes or has on hand for that matter. I had a couple mushrooms that needed to be used, therefore they got added, but if you don’t like them, don’t use them. It’s that easy and easy for a quick lunch or supper.
Servings
3 slices
Servings
3 slices
Ingredients
Servings: slices
Units:
Instructions
  1. In a cast-iron skillet, heat the oil over medium-heat. Add the garlic and onions and cook for approx. 5 minutes, stirring so as not to burn them.
  2. Reduce the heat to a low setting and add the ketchup, sorghum or molasses, sucanat, peppers, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce and salt to taste and stir.
  3. Let this simmer together for 2-25 minutes. Taste when done and adjust taste to your liking, more salt or sugar. This is a good recipe to make ahead of time and have on hand for those times when you want to barbecue your meat or add sauce to your dishes.
  4. Once the sauce is done, or if you made ahead of time, as I like to do, the sandwich melt becomes quick and easy.
  5. In a bowl, add the chicken, the mushrooms, additional onion, if you like or any other add-ins your family likes. Mix in enough sauce to coat the meat to your liking.
  6. Place the sourdough bread slices or open face sourdough buns on a baking sheet or stone and add your barbeque meat to the top. Pile on as much as you like.
  7. Sprinkle the top with cheese, again as much or little as you like and bake for 10-12 minutes or until heated through and cheese is melted. I did this at 375 degrees but you could do at 350 for 5-8 minutes and switch to broil and brown the cheese, either works great. It’s really a matter of preference.
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Chicken Fajitas

Chicken fajitas

Chicken Fajitas
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Servings
4 servings
Servings
4 servings
Chicken Fajitas
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Servings
4 servings
Servings
4 servings
Ingredients
Servings: servings
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Instructions
  1. Combine first 6 ingredients, stirring well. Place chicken in a zip-top plastic bag. Add 3/4 cup beer mixture to bag; seal. Reserve remaining beer mixture. Marinate in refrigerator for 1 hour, turning occasionally. Combine onion, bell peppers, and remaining beer mixture in a zip-top plastic bag, and seal. Marinate for 1 hour at room temperature.
  2. Heat a grill pan or basket over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Remove chicken from bag; discard marinade. Sprinkle chicken evenly with salt and black pepper. Add chicken to pan; cook for 2 minutes on each side or until done. Remove chicken from pan; keep warm. Remove onion and bell peppers from bag, and discard marinade. Add onion mixture to pan; cook for 6 minutes or until tender, turning after 3 minutes. Toast tortillas in pan, if desired. Place 2 tortillas on each of 4 plates, and divide chicken mixture evenly among tortillas. Divide onion mixture evenly among servings. Garnish with jalapeño slices. Serve with salsa, sour cream, and cilantro, if desired.
  3. Recipe adapted from www.cookinglight.com
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Can you help spread the word?

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Another awesome week and great conversations with so many leave me feeling blessed and humbled.

Have a told you lately how blessed I am to be a Holistic Health Coach? Do you realize that I “get to” help so many on their health journeys?

I don’t “have to” share any of the amazing wisdom and knowledge that I have gained over the years, I “get to”.

So, I am asking your support in spreading the word on so many accounts. If you or a loved one is suffering needlessly and needs some guidance, send them my way.

If you or a loved one is befuddled with where to truly start, ask me, I’ll help demystify and together we’ll make a game plan to start walking in the right and best direction.

The basis of this article really was to shed some light on chickens, as I was engaged in a conversation this week with a gentleman who has Celiac disease and he and his wife are navigating the healthier side of nutrition and practicing what they are learning.

Trial and error is what happens a lot for all of us. We quickly figure out what we don’t know and quickly go figure it out. However, there are many who just get frustrated and give up! This is where spreading the word comes in too! We can’t keep what we know a secret. We have to share and pass along!

In our conversation, it was mentioned that he needed to consume bone broth “stock” and said that they could go to “Sam’s Club” and get a rotisserie chicken for $5 bucks, and you can’t beat that.

While I listened to him say this, it struck me that this is a lot of the thinking that has gotten us into trouble with our health.

We think in terms of cost, what’s easiest and fastest. While I’m not saying this is necessarily wrong, what if we tweaked this line of thinking.

What if we processed our thoughts with, how can I consume the freshest, locally grown or raised meats and produce at the best possible price? How could I best benefit his/her family while doing the same for mine?

Could you imagine what our economy would look like, not only our economic climate, but our health as well?

If we were to stop relying on what’s cheapest and easiest and switch from what’s freshest and raised locally and in season, what would your world look like?

Does it take a little more thought and planning? Sure, but not really any more than you’re currently doing by making the many trips to the grocery or through the drive-thru restaurants.

While I gave the gentlemen some education on the difference between his $5 chicken and a good healthy pastured chicken, by basically saying that there really is no comparison in terms of health and nutrition in the two.

Comparison in terms of fat – pasture-raised poultry contain 21 percent less fat than conventional chickens and 30 percent less saturated fat.

Pastured-raised poultry has 50 percent more vitamin A compared to conventional raised broilers.

Omega-3 fatty acids are significantly higher as well, which reduce your risks of cancer. People with higher levels of Omega-3 are less likely to have high blood pressure or irregular heartbeat. They are 50 percent less likely to suffer a heart attack and less likely to suffer from depression, schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder or Alzheimer’s disease.

It has been estimated that only 40 percent of Americans consume an adequate supply of omega-3 fatty acids. Twenty percent have blood levels so low that they cannot be detected. Switching to meat, milk and dairy products of grass-fed animals is one way to restore this vital nutrient to your diet.

There is also no residue from pesticides, growth hormones or other chemicals that you will have from commercially raised birds.

Best of all, the excellent texture and taste won’t even come close to comparing to a commercial raised bird.

When the birds are healthy, so are you. When you support your local farmer, our economy is healthy. You see, it’s a win, win, win!

The gentlemen shared that he would probably have to go far to obtain pasture-raised chicken and I shared a local farmer’s location; he was delighted to know that it wasn’t truly very far to go to get good food.

Let’s also not forget about the wonderful egg. Hens raised on pasture are far more nutritious than hens confined in factory farms. Eggs from hens raised on pasture are also showing 4 to 6 times as much Vitamin D as typical supermarket eggs.

Not to mention 1/3 less cholesterol, ¼ less saturated fat, 2/3 more vitamin A, 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids, 3 times more Vitamin E and 7 times more beta carotene.

So you see I need help spreading the word. The word of health, hope and healing. Are you up for the challenge?

To your health,

Kellie

Holistic Health Coach

 

PS: Claim your spot now, don’t delay or think about it anymore. Life is too short to dilly dally, as they say! Click here and “Let’s talk”.