Interested in spicing up your health?

Healthy Herbs, Garlic, and Ginger Root on a Tray

Last week I shared the not so good things about conventional spices and some things to be aware of when purchasing spices and blends from the store or better yet buy handcrafted blends from a trusted source. This week I’d like to dive into some herbs and spices that are beneficial. Interested in spicing up your health?

Let’s look at some of my favorites. We will also explore how this benefits you and some fun ways in which to use them.

Cayenne Pepper and the heat factor in chilies is brought on by capsaicin, a substance that makes peppers hot. Highly therapeutic, the substance helps relieve aches and soreness. It’s even an active ingredient in some over-the-counter pain relieving creams. Other medical benefits include improved circulation, heart health and helping fight prostate cancer and ulcers. It may lower the risk of skin and colon cancers; studies show it also helps people eat fewer calories. Try hot pepper on pizza or in pasta adds a spicy kick to foods like vegetables, tuna and turkey.

Fennel dates to the times of the Ancient Greeks. Fennel is high in calcium, which is essential for the healthy growth of bones and teeth and rich in niacin, which helps to turn food into energy. Fennel is also high in vitamin C, which helps to promote a strong immune system and is an excellent source of dietary fiber and iron, which help to keep your metabolism and digestive tract running smoothly. Fennel is also a natural appetite suppressant and can also help detoxify and exfoliate the skin. This peppery plant can be served raw or cooked, but the highest nutritional value comes from consuming fennel leaves raw in salads. It can also be steamed with other greens or used in stir fry and fish recipes.

Cinnamon comes from the bark of a tropical evergreen tree and has one of the highest antioxidant values of any spice. The spice has been shown to reduce inflammation, lower blood sugar and blood triglyceride levels, alleviate nausea and increase sensitivity to insulin as an aid in fat burning. It’s also a good source of manganese, iron and calcium. Cinnamon also kills bacteria, so the next time you get a cut, you can sprinkle the spice on the wound. Just 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon daily lowers blood sugar, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and triglycerides in people with type 2 diabetes. While cinnamon is an incredibly healthy and nutritious spice, the most common uses are coffee, cookies, muffins and desserts. But there are healthier ways to reap the benefits of this magical spice: pour it over oatmeal, yogurt, applesauce or cottage cheese, stir it into peanut butter or protein shakes and sprinkle it on sweet potatoes or carrots.

Ginger in its whole form is a tree root. This underground stem is excellent for treating upset stomachs, gas and bloating, sore throats and colds in addition to other conditions, such as arthritis and motion sickness. Ginger can stop nausea and may also relieve heartburn and bloating. This spice can help lower your cholesterol and blood pressure and generally reduce your risk of heart disease. A spicy herb that is used in both sweet and savory dishes, ginger can be sliced, grated, sugared or eaten like candy. Ginger is staple in many baked goods and Asian dishes and can also be consumed as a tea, which can help ease an upset stomach. Add it to your diet by dipping a whole-grain roll in olive oil instead of butter. Then add a sprinkle of sage and black pepper. Try adding a few slices of fresh ginger to stir-fries or salad dressings. It’s a favorite of mine fermented or added to kombucha.

Turmeric contains an active component called curcumin, which may stop cancer from spreading and help prevent type 2 diabetes. Many claim that this bright orange-yellow spice provides pain relief equal or better to over-the-counter remedies such as ibuprofen. Turmeric is also being investigated for its potential benefits for those with Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis. An incredibly powerful antioxidant, turmeric contains anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties while helping to digest fats quickly. The spice can be added in pinches to a variety of foods including meats and salads, making it easy to consume. Curries and sauces are also great bases for turmeric.

Oregano has antiviral, antibacterial, anticancer, antioxidant and antibiotic properties. Its oil and leaves are used medicinally in treating cough, fever, congestion, body-ache and other illnesses. Use it as a seasoning in stews, pizzas and tomato-based sauces. Whenever possible, opt for fresh oregano leaves, which can enhance the flavor of salads and soups. Fabulous base for many great Italian seasoning blends and dressing mixes.

Basil A popular herb used to season sauces, soups, salads and pasta dishes, basil is known to have exceptionally powerful antioxidant properties that can protect the body from premature aging, common skin issues and some types of cancer. The herb contains plant pigments that shield your cell structures from oxygen and radiation damage and can be applied to wounds to help prevent bacterial infections. Basil is an easy addition to any diet. Toss a few basil leaves into your favorite dish for a fresh burst of flavor or use whole leaves and tomato slices to make a flavorful salad. It’s also often used as the foundation of a great pesto, which I love on pizza.

Nutmeg contains antibacterial compounds that may help fight listeria, E. coli, and salmonella, per research. Try nutmeg in soups or chicken dishes or on sweet potatoes.

Cumin is a potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant that may help stop tumor growth. Try cumin in tacos, or use it as a rub on meats or in chili and is excellent with black beans.

Peppermint is a great source of vitamin C and A and can help soothe indigestion and irritable bowel syndrome. Here’s how you can add it to your diet: Puree 2 tablespoons fresh mint with 1/2 cup yogurt or ricotta cheese. Serve with berries. This beautiful scent is an excellent essential oil used for helping those who suffer from headaches and migraines.

Garlic destroys cancer cells and may disrupt the metabolism of tumor cells, says Karen Collins, RD, nutrition advisor to the American Institute for Cancer Research. “Studies suggest that one or two cloves weekly provide cancer-protective benefits.” Let garlic sit for 10 to 15 minutes after chopping and before cooking so the active form of the protective phytochemicals develops. Sauté fresh garlic over low heat and mix with pasta, red pepper flakes, and Parmesan cheese.

As you can see, there are many wonderful benefits, other than the pure pleasure of our taste buds with these chosen herbs and spices.

Do you have a favorite herb, spice or remedy that others could benefit from? If so, please share in the comments below and let’s help each other.

To your health,

Kellie

Holistic Wellness Mentor

Some of the sources were from FITNESS magazine and Men’s Health.

Tomato Soup with Grilled Cheese

Tomato Soup with Grilled Cheese
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
4 tablespoons butter 1 onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 28-32 ounces crushed tomatoes (home canned is best) 3 cups chicken stock (or vegetable) ¼ cup heavy cream Salt and pepper, to taste Fresh basil Grilled cheese: 8 slices Sourdough bread 8 slices Raw milk cheese Butter
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5-10 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5-10 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Tomato Soup with Grilled Cheese
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
4 tablespoons butter 1 onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 28-32 ounces crushed tomatoes (home canned is best) 3 cups chicken stock (or vegetable) ¼ cup heavy cream Salt and pepper, to taste Fresh basil Grilled cheese: 8 slices Sourdough bread 8 slices Raw milk cheese Butter
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5-10 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5-10 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. In a large pot, melt 1-2 tablespoons butter over medium heat. Add onion and cook until they begin to soften, about 2-3 minutes. Stir in the minced garlic and cook until the garlic smells delicious. Add the tomatoes, the stock, salt and pepper to taste.
  2. Bring to a boil and then simmer for about 15 minutes. Stir in the fresh cream and garnish with fresh basil, torn into small pieces.
  3. While the soup is cooking, butter each piece of bread, cut your cheese, and grill the sandwiches are golden brown.
  4. I recently a saw a video that made rolled grilled cheese. They basically rolled out the bread to make it flatter, added the cheese and rolled it up and then grilled on all sides. Easy dippers for something different.
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

Fall Preservation…one baby step at a time!

food-prep

I have to admit…I love warm weather and with that said…I love some parts of the change in seasons too. I thought it was a good time to look at Fall Preservation…one baby step at a time!

Have you every canned, frozen, fermented or dehydrated foods? If not, don’t freak out, let’s make it super simple?

What do you buy and use the most? Is it tomatoes, green beans, corn, etc.? Maybe it’s soup, broth, or even berries for that smoothie or yogurt topper.

Now’s the time to think through what you think you could tackle and undertake. My husband’s family is Italian, you might guess that we use a lot of tomatoes and tomato products, like juice, sauce, etc.

Canning tomatoes is really pretty easy and basic directions can be obtained from trusted canning books, online or a friend or family member.

The idea is to keep it simple and to proceed forward, one baby step at a time.

When our children were young, my husband and I loved to make them fruit leathers (or rollups). This is done by using fresh fruit when in season and then dehydrating. A basic dehydrator can be purchased rather cheaply or buy a used one from a garage sale.

By doing this, we provided fresh fruit, no chemicals or hidden toxins, we saved tons of money AND the kids loved them. If you’ve never had homemade fruit leathers, you’re missing out.

Maybe it’s freezing green beans or corn because you seem to use a lot of those items. Or even berries. I love to take advantage of the seasonal bounty and then I save money later and I also supported a local grower if I wasn’t able to grow myself.

We do have a garden, but we don’t grow everything we need. Farmer’s markets are a great source, local growers or even taking advantage of friends and families extra bounty.

Even making homemade soups and broth are so much healthier, tastier and cheaper to make yourself.

Think you don’t have the time. What if when making supper, you put on an extra pan, toss in some tomatoes as an example and let them cook, and then can them.

Another favorite, gather friends or family, make some freezer meals ahead of time and while you are prepping, make some fruit leathers for lunches and snacks.

The idea is to find one thing that you are interested in or use a lot of a master that one thing. Keep it simple. Don’t make it hard, don’t overthink it. Just decide and then do.

Guess what will happen then? Celebration and joy at what you were able to do. And, if you get the family involved, just think what you all learn together and what I also know is this…gratitude is over the top. You get to appreciate your efforts and the fresh foods you have prepared and enjoy throughout the winter.

I hope that I’ve inspired you to at least think about something you could start with. Then, I’d like you to share your stories and the journey. I’d also like you to share any questions you have about starting. Let’s do this together!

To your health,

Kellie

Holistic Wellness Mentor

Are you addicted?

sugar

A conversation last night led me to the need to share this info today. We all love sweet treats right? The problem that I think most of us know, is that sugar is very addictive…we want more and more. Are you addicted?

I’ve shared before that it’s like crack cocaine…that’s how addictive it can be for some. If you’ve ever been addicted to something and try to leave it, what happens?

We become cranky, we crave it more, we obsess about it, often times to the point where we cave and feed the need.

This then follows by a feeling of bliss, then feelings of being ashamed to have failed at our resolve and then if you had the high of the chocolate or treat, you crash and the cycle starts all over again.

Just me writing this, has me thinking about dark chocolate and my love/hate relationship with it. Can you relate?

You might be asking…what’s wrong with sugar anyway?

For one, it’s empty food that replaces the nutrient-dense foods that our bodies crave and need for optimal health.

  • In 1700 the average sugar consumption of sugar was only four pounds per person per year.
  • In 1800 consumption was eighteen pounds per year.
  • In 1900 consumption was ninety pounds per year.
  • Today consumption is around one hundred eighty pounds per person per year or about one-half pound (one cup) per day.
  • Most of the increase since 1975 has been in the form of high fructose corn syrup.

Ironically, the increase in sugar consumption has also shown a dramatic increase in chronic diseases and the obesity rate is out of control.

  • 1890 the US Obesity rate for white males was 3.4 percent
  • 1975 the rate of the entire population was 15 percent
  • Today the rate is 32 percent and climbing

Let’s focus on our children for a minute. A sugar-diet is particularly harmful for children as it is often replacing nutrient-dense foods like meat, butter, eggs and cheese, which children need for optimum growth. High sugar consumption during childhood sets children up for serious diseases in adulthood, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer and depression.

In addition to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and diabetes, many other diseases and adverse health effects are caused by sugar, such as:

  • Addiction
  • ADHD, Hyperactivity
  • Adrenal gland fatigue
  • Allergies, asthma
  • Alterations of “feel good” neurotransmitters (dopamine, GABA, endorphins, serotonin)
  • Brain fog
  • Cancer
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Candida overgrowth
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Compromised wound healing
  • Dental cavities
  • Depression
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Fatty liver disease (NASH)
  • Gout
  • High blood pressure
  • High insulin levels
  • High triglyceride levels
  • High uric acid levels (an independent risk factor for heart disease)
  • Increased stomach acidity
  • Infertility
  • Kidney disease
  • Malnutrition
  • Metabolic syndrome (a group of symptoms, obesity, high HTL, hypertension, low HDL and high fasting blood sugar)
  • Obesity and rubber tire syndrome
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pancreatic stress
  • Poor sleep
  • Premature aging
  • Reduced immunity, frequent infections

Industrial sweeteners to avoid and are identified as the following:

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) (worse than sugar – rats on high-fructose diets end up with livers like those of alcoholics and do not reproduce).

Agave (made in the same way as HFCS, contains up to 90% manufactured fructose)

Processed Fruit Juices

Aspartame (Nutra-Sweet and Equal)

Sucralose (Splenda)

Others: Corn syrup, fructose, dextrose, glucose, brown rice syrup, imitation syrups, heated honey, stevia extract, maltodextrin and sugar alcohols (xylitol, mannitol, erythritol, sorbitol)

Some natural sweeteners, used in strict moderation are much healthier choices and when making sweet treats, made with healthy fats like butter, coconut oil, lard, egg yolks, cream and nuts.

  • Maple syrup
  • Maple sugar
  • Raw honey, unfiltered
  • Molasses
  • Green stevia leaves and powder
  • Dehydrated sugar cane juice (Rapadura or Sucanat)
  • Coconut, palm or date sugar
  • Sorghum syrup
  • Malt syrups (barley) – may contain gluten

As I mentioned above, sugar cravings are very real and with sugar being addictive, hard to give up. Some suggested tips that have worked for many are:

  • Eating 3 meals a day with animal protein and plenty of healthy natural fats, like butter, eggs yolks, cream and meat fats.
  • Not skipping breakfast and having animal protein and fats
  • If you have in between meal hunger, snack on something fatty and salty, like nuts, cheese or salami
  • Don’t shop when hungry as this leads to unwanted purchases and don’t keep sweets at home or the office.
  • Drinking kombucha (fermented tea) is a great alternative to pop or soda
  • For the occasional sweet treat, make homemade treats with the natural sweeteners recommended above and include natural healthy fats like butter, cream, coconut oil, egg yolks and nuts.
  • A homeopathic remedy called Argentum nitricum can be really helpful for people with strong sugar cravings.

Sugar is a very real problem and hopefully this information can be taken with a grain of salt and lead to life changes. I know the journey might be a little bumpy, but with some real desire for positive change, it can be accomplished and celebrated.

Just think how much better you are going to feel, how much more energy and if you are suffering from chronic illness, how many meds you may get off of.

What’s been your experience with sugar addictions and how have you slayed the dragon?

To your health,

Kellie

Holistic Wellness Mentor

References: www.westonaprice.org

 

Chewy Spiced Molasses Cookies

http://www.myhumblekitchen.com/nourishing-cookies-healthy-holiday-10-naturally-sweetened-holiday-cookie-recipes/?ap_id=nourishedkitchen

Chewy Spiced Molasses Cookies
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
These cookies have all the spice that you’d want in holiday treat. Soft and chewy, dark and rich, make sure to make a batch of these cookies to celebrate the Holidays this year. This recipe is shared from Nourishing Cookies, a delightful little ebook featuring wholesome, natural cookie recipes for wintertime holidays.
Servings Prep Time
3 dozen 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minutes 4 hrs. 15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
3 dozen 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minutes 4 hrs. 15 minutes
Chewy Spiced Molasses Cookies
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
These cookies have all the spice that you’d want in holiday treat. Soft and chewy, dark and rich, make sure to make a batch of these cookies to celebrate the Holidays this year. This recipe is shared from Nourishing Cookies, a delightful little ebook featuring wholesome, natural cookie recipes for wintertime holidays.
Servings Prep Time
3 dozen 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minutes 4 hrs. 15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
3 dozen 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minutes 4 hrs. 15 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: dozen
Units:
Instructions
  1. In a medium sized bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, ground cinnamon, ground cloves, ground ginger, and salt; set aside.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together at medium speed the butter, honey, and molasses until light and fluffy; about 3 minutes. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing for about 30 seconds each. Lower the stand mixer speed to slow and incorporate the flour mixture, ½ cup at a time, until just combined. Do not over beat.
  3. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and chill the dough for at least 4 hours or preferably overnight.
  4. Preheat the oven to 375F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place the turbinado sugar into a bowl. Roll the cookie dough between your hands into 1” balls.
  5. Roll the balls into the turbinado sugar and place on top of the parchment lined cookie sheet, 12 cookies at a time. Bake for 8-10 minutes. Allow to cool on the baking sheet for a minute or two before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.
Recipe Notes

If you are concerned about phytic acid in whole wheat pastry flour, substitute high-extraction flour or sprouted flours.

Photo courtesy of www.nourishedkitchen.com

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

Do you ever wish for easy and safe shopping?

Woman holding grocery bags containing vegetables, mid section

I don’t know about you, but sometimes it is just plain exhausting wondering what’s in our food and then attempting to buy things that aren’t going to be detrimental to your health. Am I right?

A recent conversation about sweet corn at a local farmer’s market, led me to thinking about other conversations about not assuming that what you are buying is safe, if you wish not to consume genetically modified foods or pesticides, or herbicides.

Sweet corn is no different. While most isn’t a GMO crop, unless you are buying organic or know the grower personally, you can’t be entirely sure.

So what’s the easiest and safest way to shop? Stop shopping in the grocery store. I promise you, they won’t miss you if you stopped shopping tomorrow. Source your foods from trusted producers. You can literally find everything you need, food wise outside the grocery store.

I personally only shop the store for paper products, minimal health and beauty items (i.e.: razors, floss, etc.) and canning jars. I can’t tell you the last time I shopped up and down the grocery isles for food.

The best thing about buying your food from your neighbor? You support their family. They spend some of their earnings in the local economy and we continue supporting one another AND we enjoy good clean food, which in turn affords us good health.

If while building your producer list you still need to fill in the gap at the grocery store, I thought I’d empower you to shop smarter, since we all have the right to know what’s in our food and labeling isn’t an option yet today, hopefully soon.

Following is the current crop list. If you wish to avoid GMO products, then keep this list handy.

GM Crop List*

  • Alfalfa
  • Apple
  • Argentine Canola
  • Bean
  • Carnation
  • Chicory
  • Cotton
  • Creeping Bentgrass
  • Eggplant
  • Eucalyptus
  • Flax
  • Maize
  • Melon
  • Papaya
  • Petunia
  • Plum
  • Polish Canola
  • Poplar
  • Potato
  • Rice
  • Rose
  • Soybean
  • Squash
  • Sugar Beet
  • Sugarcane
  • Sweet Pepper
  • Tobacco
  • Tomato
  • Wheat

*Source: http://www.isaaa.org/gmapprovaldatabase/cropslist/

There are a couple apps that are very handy. If found this shopping guide, but this one is only for iPhones. If you know of one for Android, please share in the comments below.

Non-GMO Project Shopping Guide App by The Non-GMO Project

There is also a shopping guide and app (iTunes or Google Play) for the Dirty Dozen and Clean 15 that is put out by EWG (Environmental Working Group) that I find super helpful, especially when shopping and you can’t afford, or can’t find all organic items.

When using these tools, I find the information helpful when shopping at your local farmer’s markets as well. It helps you to know what are trigger foods and important questions to ask about growing practices.

What have you found to be a good way to find local producers that provide what you need? Let’s help each other build our producer lists. Comment below and we’ll get started.

To your health,

Kellie

How eating dirt is actually good for your gut

Healthy Benefits of Eating Dirt
So why exactly does soil, or more specifically soil-based organisms support a healthy gut and immune system response? Plants need them to grow otherwise they become disease laden, malnourished and harvest fugi, mold, candida and yeasts.

As I mentioned in my video, these healthy organisms are needed by the ball ball or gut system of the plant, we need these organisms to live a healthy and long life too.

There are over 800 scientific studies that reference soil-based organism and what do you suppose they have in common? They all link soil-based organisms to successfully treating many illnesses and diseases, including:

* Allergies
* Asthma
* Gas
* Indigestion
* Ulcerative Colitis
* Irritable bowel syndrome
* Malabsorption
* Autoimmune and inflammatory diseases
* Nausea
* Indigestion
* Bacterial, fungal and viral infections

It is known that soil-based organisms nourish the cells in the liver and the colon and they then actually create B vitamins, vitamin K2, enzymes and antioxidants.

Another amazing benefit of soil-based organisms is that they can wipe out harmful pathogens like candida, fungi and parasites. They also kill bad bacteria that binds to or is known to puncture the gut lining. They bind to the toxins and remove them from our bodies. They also help smooth out the immune system and reduce inflammation naturally in the gut and throughout our entire bodies.

Some of the best ways to eat more dirt

1. Eat foods from your garden, not too clean (just rinsing is fine) and don’t peel, Remember as I mentioned, when you grow organically without the use of pesticides and herbicides, your plant benefits and so do you.

2. Eating plenty of fermented foods and drinks, like sauerkraut, kimchi, kombucha, good yogurt and kefir. Lactose intolerance is definately on the rise due to pasteurization which kills of beneficial enzymes and probiotics. When raw and fermented dairy are incorporated, those symptoms often diminish as well.

3. Taking your shoes off and playing in the dirt or just walking around barefoot gets you connected to the earth and allows us to pick up many beneficial bacteria.

4. Eating local raw honey and bee pollen are helpful in helping with seasonal allergies, as most don’t spend enough time outdoors. It strengthens the immune system, acts as an inflammatory agent and supports the liver.

5. Epsom salt baths help the body uptake needed minerals and microbes, which also help support the skin, reduce inflammation and if you live near an ocean, take a regular dip or two. It does a body good.

Today, we are missing out on our vitamin dirt, thanks in part to oversanitation and antibacterial use, like hand sanitizers, antibacterial soaps and germ-killing wipes.

Our connection ot the dirt is narrowing, so I say….

Get out and play in the dirt…literally!

Kellie

Beet and Spinach Salad

Beet and spinach salad

Beet and Spinach Salad
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
When I was at my Mom's recently, there was access to fresh spinach and beets from the garden. My brother's friend can't do too many raw vegetables, so this was a way to utilize fresh produce and accomomdate a cooked vegetable that isn't cooked too much. Hope you enjoy my adaption.
Servings
4 servings
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings
4 servings
Cook Time
20 minutes
Beet and Spinach Salad
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
When I was at my Mom's recently, there was access to fresh spinach and beets from the garden. My brother's friend can't do too many raw vegetables, so this was a way to utilize fresh produce and accomomdate a cooked vegetable that isn't cooked too much. Hope you enjoy my adaption.
Servings
4 servings
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings
4 servings
Cook Time
20 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Units:
Instructions
  1. Place spinach in a large bowl.
  2. Heat oil in a large cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, until starting to soften, about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, olives, parsley and garlic and cook, stirring, until the tomatoes begin to break down, about 3 minutes.
  3. Add beets, vinegar, salt and pepper and cook, stirring, until the beets are heated through, about 1 minute more. Add the beet mixture to the spinach and toss to combine. Serve warm.
Recipe Notes

Note: I peeled, cut and steamed the beets separately. This takes approx. 15 minutes as you want them slightly crisp, not mushy.

The original recipe, minus my tweaks came from Eatingwell.com

Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe

A must read if you travel by airplane

Airport scanner

Over three years ago I stopped going through the full body scanners at airports because I suspected that I wasn’t getting the full story about the harm these scanners do and opted for the “pat down” which is uncomfortable the first time you have to experience it, but you may wish to opt for this too after reading this.

Post 911, air travelers are herded through checkpoint corrals into a anti-terrorism full body scanner.

The transportation Security Administration (TSA) claims these so-called advanced imagining technology devices are just as safe as traditional metal detectors. Is this really the truth?

While the technology has changed since post 911 from backscatter x-ray tunnels to a different type of screening technology that is said to be safer, the millimeter wave machine, I’m still skeptic as we all should be.

If you were to look at the TSA’s FAQ page, millimeter wave imaging technology “uses harmless electromagnetic waves to detect potential threats, which are highlighted on a generic outline of a person appearing on a monitor attached to the unit. If no anomalies are detected, an ‘OK’ appears on the screen with no outline.”

This is so misleading. The government really doesn’t want you to know that the doses of electromagnetic radiation emitted by the TSA’s millimeter wave technology machines can cause cancer.

This same technology is used in the very treatment of skin cancer, because it has known skin heating properties, means it has an effect on our human cells. This heating is caused by microwave frequencies entering our skin and inducing a certain level of atomic motion with the cellular structure. Basically, the millimeter wave radiation microwaves our skin.

Of course not everyone agrees, but most scientists agree that any amount of radiation poses at least some level of risk. We have a right to know both this level of risk and what we can to minimize or eliminate it.

These scanners act as a giant microwave that literally heats travelers’ bodies at the cellular level using ultra-high frequencies not normally found in nature.

Microwave ovens operate at nearly the same frequencies as these machines. The cause cellular vibrations strong enough to generate heat in food, so can you imagine what they are doing to your skin?

So you might be thinking, well I’m not a bowl of soup and getting zapped for 30 seconds, however the principal is still the same, especially when you take into account the repeated exposures and that the millimeter wave radiation, which disrupts cellular communication in ways that science hasn’t yet fully realized.

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that millimeter waves not only heat the skin but also damage eyesight and cause cancer, particularly of the skin.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has found preliminary evidence that these low levels may affect the immune system, which means the body may be less able to fight off sickness and disease.

In the end, you might want to do as I’ve done and skip the full body scanner and opt out of the TSA screening process. By choosing the manual “pat down” you can minimize your radiation exposure and thus minimize the risk of developing cancer. While it may take a couple minutes longer to go through this portion of security, in the long run, you and your health will thank you.

What has been your experience been with airport scanners? Have you asked to opt-out?

To your health,

Kellie

Creamy Honey Mustard

Creamy Honey Mustard
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Rich and creamy dressing doesn't have to be hard. When you can control the wholesome ingredients, you remove worry about toxins and chemicals when you use the very best. Aren't you and your family worth it?
Servings Prep Time
3/4 cups 5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
3/4 cups 5 minutes
Creamy Honey Mustard
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Rich and creamy dressing doesn't have to be hard. When you can control the wholesome ingredients, you remove worry about toxins and chemicals when you use the very best. Aren't you and your family worth it?
Servings Prep Time
3/4 cups 5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
3/4 cups 5 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: cups
Units:
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients together until creamy. Store in a jar in the refrigerator.
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe